We make our Dry Rosé by direct pressing red grapes. What we get is the most delicate expression of the grape. The juice is then fermented in very old barrels. After primary fermentation, malolactic fermentation is discouraged by the addition of a moderate amount of SO2. During the winter, we choose which lots to combine, and ‘rack’ them together in a tank, then returning the wine to the same neutral barrels to further age on their lees (yeast sediment). The additional time in barrel on the yeast lees helps contribute to the complexity and mouthfeel of our Dry Rosé. The wine is then racked off the lees one last time, filtered, and bottled. It is the only wine we routinely filter, to prevent malolactic fermentation from occurring in the bottle.


Dry Rosé
  • 2006 — released March 2007
  • 2007 — released March 2008
  • 2008 — released April 2009
  • 2009 — released April 2010
  • 2010 — released April 2011
  • 2011 — released April 2012
  • 2012 — released March 2013
  • 2013 — released April 2014
  • 2014 — released April 2015
  • 2015 — released April 2016

Dry Rosé of Syrah
  • 2012 — released July 2013
  • 2013 — released October 2014
  • 2014 — released October 2015

Vin Gris
  • 1997 — released April 1998
  • 1998 — released April 1999
  • 1999 — released April 2000
  • 2000 — released April 2001
  • 2001 — released April 2002
  • 2002 — released July 2003
  • 2003 — released July 2004
  • 2004 — released July 2005
  • 2005 — released March 2006

Vin Gris of Cabernet
  • 2003 — released July 2004
  • 2004 — released July 2005

Vin Gris of Pinot Noir
  • 2003 — released July 2004

Vin Gris of Zinfandel
  • 2005 — released March 2006